Category Archives: Fiction

So how do you organise your book shelves?

So how do you organise your book shelves?

Never let it be said we’re not exciting in Tunbridge Wells. Not only have we recently had our own sex festival, but our librarians have gone crazy…

redbooks

They’ve been arranging the books by colour instead of the normal (boring) categories.

blue books

I must admit I loved it. Particularly on a grey day. Look at the yellow suns here… I noticed I wasn’t the only one walking round the table stroking them.

sunshine books

What do you mean, you don’t stroke books? How else do you let them know that you’ll come back and read them one day?

colourful books

But aside from the joy of it – and shouldn’t libraries and books be about joy? – it felt like I’d walked into one of my own short stories, In Good Order, in which a man tries a bit too hard to distil order on his life/wife via their book shelves. It’s here if you want to read it …. In Good Order.

More books… #100Women100Books

More books… #100Women100Books
More books… #100Women100Books

Following on from this post collating the recommendations we’ve been getting through the #100Women100Books project, perhaps ONE HUNDRED books aren’t quite enough for you. So I’m going to keep putting up the choices we’ve been getting through our website, www.spreadsheetsandmoxie.wordpress.com. As I hope you know, we are still collecting book recommendations – please visit the website and add yours….

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From: Jacqueline Kington
Book: Long time no see by Hannah Lowe
Why I chose this book: It just touched me very deeply. She is a wonderful writer…
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From: Rachel Seeland Scott
Book: Only Every Yours by Louise O’Neill
Why I chose this book: I chose this book because of its controversial theme and captivating writing, which evokes vivid imagery. To me, it was fascinating, as it took everything girls did to each other in secret and turned it into a social normality which was encouraged as: ‘there is always room for improvement’. The writer also encourages us to review our ethical code, since the girls are made and not born, which is shown by their lower case names and treatment by the human males of this dystopian society.
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From: Ali Jones
Book: Tale for a Time Being by Ruth Ozeki
Why I chose this book: I love the clever way this book creates a gripping narrative woven with Zen wisdom.
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From: Alison Belfield
Book: Cat’s Eye by Margaret Atwood
Why I chose this book: This is the first book by Margaret Atwood I read. It was so brilliant that I went on to read all her others; my world is a better place for having her books in it.
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From: Helen Jamieson
Book: Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
Why I chose this book: Because she could see into the mind of a tortured man. I think it is a great love story, powerful, sad and tragic and beautifully written. Heathcliffe is one of fictions greatest.
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From: Jane Rogers
Book: THE GOLDEN NOTEBOOK by Doris Lessing
Why I chose this book: This is the most honest novel about relationships between men and women that I have ever read. It changed the way I thought about political involvement, feminism, and writing, and is as timely now as when it was published in 1962.

Nan Shepherd and Jane Austen compare notes…

Nan Shepherd and Jane Austen compare notes…

What might happen during a Twitter conversation between Nan Shepherd and Jane Austen about what it’s like to appear on banknotes?

Linda Cracknell and I decided to find out recently for Edinburgh University’s Dangerous Women Project.  The results can be found here…

The conversation contains a lot of imagination, a little Mark Carney, although sadly no Moomins…